The Acropolis

The acropolis hill bordering the city from the western direction is not high on the side facing the city. The acropolis hill represents the center of the city as it preserves traces of numerous cultures from the classical antiquity to the late Ottoman times. The remains of residential structures dating to the Classical period represent the earliest known archaeological occupation on the acropolis hill. Two groups of picturesque Lycian rock-cut burials and several typical Lycian sarcophagi located on the slopes represent the most characteristic sight of the acropolis hill of Tlos. The acropolis hill evidently witnessed new constructional activities during the succeeding Hellenistic period. A stadium was built at the eastern foot of the acropolis hill along with a bouleuterion (council house) and a prytaneion (seat of government). These structures first constructed in the Hellenistic period were re-used in the Roman period without any change. In the Roman period, new rock-cut burials and sarcophagi were added near the already existing ones. A new fortification wall surrounding the acropolis hill was erected in the first half of the 5th century A.D. in order to form a new settlement on the southern slopes of the acropolis hill. This small settlement was expanded beyond the fortifications in the eleventh century, resulting in the re-use of the earlier ancient structures of the city. The last occupation of the acropolis hill dates to the nineteenth century, when a notorious Ottoman feudal landlord named Ali Ağa ordered the construction of a mansion for himself on the summit, re-using stones from ancient monuments of the acropolis hill.